Recommended Resources: Will Ross on Septuagint Lexicography

The Septuagint is not an easy topic to begin reading in. The secondary literature is difficult to understand and confusing. Will Ross a Ph.D. student at Cambridge University put up a great video about Septuagint lexicography on Daily Dose of Greek. It is worth a watch! You have a couple minutes to spare!

Recommended Resources: StepBible.com

I love books! If you know anything about me you know this to be true. The idea of libraries going completely digital is equal to the unpardonable sin in my mind because I can’t fathom studying the scriptures without a desk full of books. Although I have a deep affinity for physical books, there is a diTyndaleHouseEquippinggital resource library gold mine. This resource is StepBible.com; a Bible software developed through Tyndale House. Dr. David Instone-Brewer has put together an amazing resource with many advantages.

First off, it is totally free! For a poor student, this is great! The program has a great deal of resources, commentaries, translations and texts. This is a huge benefit of a program that is comparable to a logos or accordance, but where logos can cost you thousands of dollars on resources, StepBible hands it over right in the public domain.

Second, it emphasizes the great importance of the original languages. In fact, most of the tools that are used to develop the unique functions of StepBible.com are built around the original languages. The program does not necessitate a knowledge of the biblical languages, but it certainly helps anyone seeking to deepen their understanding. With a program that is intrinsically oriented to the original languages, it begins your study off at the ground level. This basic principle of hermeneutics recognizes that you should never start at the commentary/exegetical level before diving into the original text language.

Third, not only does it start you off at the original languages, it builds additional information on the text. By just hovering your cursor over the text or a word, you are presented with a wealth of data: the semantic range of the word, the way it is parsed, how many times the word is used and so forth. What may have taken hours to find before is readily accessible with this program.

Fourth, the base is the biblical text, but they have indexed words based on their lexical morpheme. This means word searches are not based on the English word used or searching for the word in a particular verb form, but you can search its lexical form and you will find all of its occurrences in what ever range you have set.

The only downside to this program is it does not have the overwhelming amount of resources a program like Logos does. If you are looking for a deep exegetical or theological exposition of a passage, this may let you down. But for a resource that is not only free but so strongly linked to the original languages, it is hard to complain about the lack of commentaries. If that is your only concern, I would highly recommend starting with StepBible.com and then move to your closest theological library and get in contact with some physical books. I would highly recommend using this resource for any study or devotion you might be doing. You never know what you might unlock.


Recommended Resources are posts devoted to videos, blogs, articles, and sermons that have helped me think through some more difficult topics. This segment of the blog is to develop fodder for thoughtfulness in deeper content issues.

Recommended Resources: Apologetics For the Church

Churchgoers who are well equipped to make a well-thought and ardent defense of the faith are few and far between. This is for a wide variety of reasons. For instance we might still hang on to our fundamentalist roots and feel there is little need to break the barrier between us and the world or possibly we just do not have the theological arsenal God has equipped us with in order to make a good apology for the faith that is within us.

Professor Mark Farnham is Professor of Pastoral Ministry at Lancaster Bible College and currently wrapping up his PhD at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia under Dr. Scott Oliphint. He has started a new ministry called ApAP4C Logo Finalologetics for the ChurchThis ministry is not just data and information about apologetics, it is an equipping tool. Mark offers great teaching and pastoral experience which enable him to be a good balance of theory and practice. I would recommended highly Professor Farnham’s seminars and personal teaching for your church. Even more he has a blog that has served me greatly. You can read some of Mark’s thoughts on his blog here.

Professor Farnham in class not only proved he was well prepared to teach us the deep contours of apologetics but his character matched the caliber of his teaching. He is a great resource for the church and I strongly suggest supporting his ministry.


Recommended Resources are posts devoted to videos, blogs, articles, and sermons that have helped me think through some more difficult topics. This segment of the blog is to develop fodder for thoughtfulness in deeper content issues.

Recommended Resources: P.J. Williams on the Gospel’s Historical Reliability

Peter Williams is the Warden of Tyndale House at Cambridge University. He is a textual critic and Syriac scholar. This video is a lecture about how the peoples names used in the Gospels help us know how historically viable they are. It is an interesting and persuasive argument for the reliability of our four canonical gospels. Leave some comments, I love hearing your thoughts.


 

Recommended Resources are posts devoted to videos, blogs, articles, and sermons that have helped me think through some more difficult topics. This segment of the blog is to develop fodder for thoughtfulness in deeper content issues.

Recommended Resources: D.A. Carson on the Parables of Jesus

The parables of Christ have been hotly debated since the 1st century, with questions like what’s the difference between a parable and an allegory? In this video D.A. Carson sheds a great deal of light on this controversial topic! Most Christians today seem to be ignorant of the fact that there is a hot debate on how to define what a parable might even be. This video helped me grapple with the debate, which tends to foster liberal ideas, yet Carson was able to maintain his evangelical sensibilities. Carson uses the question “why did Jesus speak in parables?” to tailor his definition of what a parable is. This is a long video but persevere it is worth your time! Leave comments, I would love to start a discussion on this topic.

Recommended Resources are posts devoted to videos, blogs, articles, and sermons that have helped me think through some more difficult topics. This segment of the blog is to develop fodder for thoughtfulness in deeper content issues.

Recommended Resources: Miles Van Pelt’s Advice to Students

I am of the persuasion that the Biblical languages and education are imperative to continue to grow in the knowledge of the Lord. Dr. Miles Van Pelt has some helpful insight into how to keep up with the biblical languages once you have learned them. The study of Biblical languages is not a membership card to pure exegesis. They are a tool and give great insight into the world the Biblical authors were living in. We should cherish God’s word in the original languages, as well as our translations. Allow Dr. Van Pelt to encourage your desire for a deep and diligent understanding of God’s word.

Recommended Resources are posts devoted to videos, blogs, articles, and sermons that have helped me think through some more difficult topics. This segment of the blog is to develop fodder for thoughtfulness in deeper content issues.